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Metsä Board is delighted to announce the winner of its international packaging design competition the Better with Less – Design Challenge.

ATLANTA, Feb. 25, 2020 -- Graphic Packaging International (NYSE: GPK) (the "Company") announced today the launch of a new line of PaperSeal™ trays, offering brands and retailers the opportunity to replace Modified Atmosphere (MAP) and Vacuum Skin Packaging (VSP) plastic trays with a new barrier-lined paperboard alternative.

Stora Enso is expanding its range of renewable packaging materials by introducing new dispersion barrier materials for paper cups and food packaging.

Finland’s award-winning natural mineral water launches in the USA at the 19th annual Food Network & Cooking Channel South Beach Wine & Food Festival Presented by Capital One

Paper is increasingly perceived as a sustainable packaging material. Brand owners are increasing the pace of sustainable packaging. The flexible packaging paper Koehler NexPlus® is already successfully in use.

Metsä Group’s innovation company Metsä Spring and Valmet have initiated a joint project for the development of a novel wood-based 3D product to replace similar products made out of fossil resources, especially in consumer products like packaging.

AC Kinetics’ new motor drive software increases AC induction motor performance and energy efficiency simultaneously, overcoming a major industry roadblock.

Research at Karlstad University shows that sludge and ashes as paper mill residues can be used as effective fertilizer. This involves biochar, that is, carbon from organic material returned to the forest and thus closing the cycle.

Eli Vlaisavljevich, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering and mechanics in Virginia Tech's College of Engineering, has received a $1 million grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation to develop new technology for rapid extraction of DNA from timber and plant tissue, research that could directly impact the monolithic illegal timber trade and, ultimately, serve to protect our environment.

When Timothée Boitouzet studied architecture in Japan, where buildings need to survive earthquakes, he realised the next smart material might be one that humans have used for thousands of years—wood.

Look at anything made from trees—a ream of paper, a cardboard box, lumber—and it's probably stamped with the logo of the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) or an equivalent organization.

Filtering the salt from seawater can take a lot of energy or specialised engineering. A thin membrane made of porous wood may be able to fix that.

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