Scientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany have developed a new sustainable method of extracting the flavoring agent vanillin from lignin, a component of wood. Large quantities of waste lignin accumulate during the production of pulp, an important raw material for making paper.

Corrugated boxes bring the world to you, protecting and securing everything from smartphones and medical devices to fresh fruits and vegetables on their journey to the store shelf or your doorstep.

Polymers reinforced with ultra-fine strands of carbon fibers epitomize composite materials that are "light as a feather and strong as steel," earning them versatile applications across several industries. Adding materials called carbon nanotubes can further enhance the composites' functionality.

According to the United Nations, about one-fifth of the world's population lives in areas where water is scarce. Therefore, technologies to produce clean water from undrinkable sources, such as seawater, river or lake water, and contaminated water, are urgently needed.

The Family Forest Carbon Program announced this week it has received concept note approval on a new innovative methodology on measuring carbon sequestered by family forests from Verra, the non-profit organization that oversees the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS), the world’s leading voluntary program for the certification of greenhouse gas emissions reduction projects.

AC Kinetics’ new motor drive software increases AC induction motor performance and energy efficiency simultaneously, overcoming a major industry roadblock.

Research at Karlstad University shows that sludge and ashes as paper mill residues can be used as effective fertilizer. This involves biochar, that is, carbon from organic material returned to the forest and thus closing the cycle.

Eli Vlaisavljevich, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering and mechanics in Virginia Tech's College of Engineering, has received a $1 million grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation to develop new technology for rapid extraction of DNA from timber and plant tissue, research that could directly impact the monolithic illegal timber trade and, ultimately, serve to protect our environment.

When Timothée Boitouzet studied architecture in Japan, where buildings need to survive earthquakes, he realised the next smart material might be one that humans have used for thousands of years—wood.

More Articles ...

Page 1 of 2